Posted by: marcmwm | April 23, 2009

Kinnick Stadium is a yes for World Cup

The Kinnick-World Cup bid thingie came up again today.

Apparently, the UI is interested. Penn State, Michigan State and Nebraska said no thanks. Iowa, Ohio State and Wisconsin are yes’s.

Here’s the release:

USA BID COMMITTEE RECEIVES CONFIRMATION FROM 58 VENUES

INTERESTED IN HOLDING FIFA WORLD CUP MATCHES IN 2018 OR 2022

 

Las Vegas, Raleigh-Durham and Rice-Eccles Stadium

in Salt Lake City Express Interest

 

 

NEW YORK (April 23, 2009) – Public officials and executives representing 58 major stadiums in the U.S. last week formally confirmed interest in playing host to FIFA World Cup™ matches in 2018 or 2022, the USA Bid Committee announced today.

 

The respondents represent 58 venues in 49 metropolitan markets, ranging in size from New York City, where the new Meadowlands Stadium will open in 2010 in nearby East Rutherford, N.J., to college town markets from coast to coast.  Three new candidates also reached out to the USA Bid Committee to express their interest, including Las Vegas, Nev., which currently does not offer a suitable stadium but requested to be included as a market for consideration.

 

“We are very pleased by the impressive response, and are certainly gratified by the enthusiasm and thorough understanding everyone has shown for this unique opportunity,” said David Downs, the Executive Director for the USA Bid Committee.  “The benefits to a host nation, and particularly to the venue cities where the matches could be played, are numerous and lasting. Tourism, economic impact, meaningful global exposure and a legacy of being at the center of a FIFA World Cup™ competition await host venues and cities if we are fortunate enough to stage the tournament here in 2018 or 2022.”

 

Earlier this month, the USA Bid Committee mailed letters to public officials and executives representing 70 stadiums in more than 50 metropolitan markets.  The letters outlined FIFA’s bid process and criteria for venue selection, which includes the candidate host nation providing a minimum of 12 stadiums capable of seating 40,000 or more spectators. Stadiums with a minimum capacity of 80,000 are required by FIFA for consideration to play host to the Opening Match and Final Match.

 

In 1994, the U.S. used nine stadiums to host the FIFA World Cup™, which then featured a 24-team and 52-match format compared to today’s field of 32 nations competing in 64 matches.  Despite the smaller field and schedule of matches in 1994, the United States set an overall attendance mark of 3,587,538, a record that broke the previous tournament mark by more than one million fans and still stands today.

 

Representatives from the Las Vegas, Nev. and the Raleigh-Durham markets, as well as Rice‑Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City, Utah – none of them included in the original list of 70 venue and market candidates – have requested to be considered as hosts in 2018 or 2022.  Twelve stadiums declined to be considered as potential candidates while conversations continue with representatives of two stadiums as local officials there explore various venue feasibility issues before confirming their interest.

 

“We will soon begin contacting all venue and metro market representatives on a one-on-one basis to ensure that their candidacy is in accordance with FIFA criteria,” Downs said.  “We are looking forward to working with all the parties involved as we continue this exciting bid process.”

 

Highlights among the stadiums that have confirmed interest in playing host to matches in 2018 and 2022 include:

  • Thirty of the 31 stadiums in the National Football League have confirmed interest.  Candlestick Park, home of the San Francisco 49ers, was not listed as a candidate, meaning 100 percent of the NFL stadiums contacted by the USA Bid Committee have confirmed their candidacy.
  • More than 20 stadiums have confirmed interest that are either on college campuses or serve as the primary venue for NCAA Division I college football teams.
  • Two confirmed stadiums are currently home to Major League Soccer teams in the U.S. – Gillette Stadium (New England Revolution) and Qwest Field (Seattle Sounders).
  • All continental United States time zones are represented by stadiums in 28 states and the District of Columbia.

The United States, Australia, England, Indonesia, Japan, Mexico and Russia have formally declared their desire to host to the FIFA World Cup™ in 2018 or 2022.  Netherlands-Belgium and Portugal-Spain have each submitted joint bids for the 2018 and 2022 tournaments, while Qatar and South Korea have applied as candidates to play host only to the tournament in 2022.

 

FIFA has set May 2010 as the deadline for countries to submit their final paperwork to play host to the FIFA World Cup™ in 2018 or 2022.  FIFA’s 24‑member Executive Committee will study the bids, conduct site visits and name the two hosts for the 2018 and 2022 tournaments in December 2010, completing a 21-month bid and review process.

 

World Cup passion continues to be strong in the USA, demonstrated by the number of tickets assigned last week in the official FIFA’s selection draw for the first phase of ticket sales for the 2010 FIFA World Cup™. Outside of the host country, South Africa, the highest number of tickets drawn was to residents of the United States, with a total of 69,208 tickets. The USA had also had the highest number of online ticket applications (outside of the host country) from around the world.

 

The USA Bid Committee’s efforts have already earned the support of President Barack Obama, who has reached out to FIFA – the world’s governing body of soccer – to endorse the efforts to bring the world’s largest sporting event back to the United States.  In a letter to FIFA President Joseph “Sepp” Blatter and U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati, President Obama noted the role soccer played in his life as a youth, and its ability to unite people, communities and nations from every continent.

 

“Hosting another successful World Cup is important for the continued growth of the sport in the United States. And it is important to me personally,” President Obama wrote in his letter.  “As a child, I played soccer on a dirt road in Jakarta, and the game brought the children of my neighborhood together. As a father, I saw that same spirit of unity alive on the fields and sidelines of my own daughters’ soccer games in Chicago.”

 

“Soccer is truly the world’s sport, and the World Cup promotes camaraderie and friendly competition across the globe,” President Obama added.  “That is why this bid is about much more than a game. It is about the United States of America inviting the world to gather all across our great country in celebration of our common hopes and dreams.”

U.S. Soccer and the USA Bid Committee announced last month that former U.S. Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger accepted an invitation to join the USA Bid Committee and play a leadership role in the nation’s candidacy to play host to FIFA World Cup™ in 2018 or 2022. 

ABOUT U.S. SOCCER:

Founded in 1913, U.S. Soccer has helped chart the course for soccer in the USA for more than 95 years as the governing body of the sport. In this time, the Federation’s mission statement has been simple and clear: to make soccer, in all its forms, a pre-eminent sport in the United States and to continue the development of soccer at all recreational and competitive levels. To that end, the sport’s growth in the past two decades has been nothing short of remarkable as U.S. Soccer’s National Teams have continually succeeded on the world stage while also growing the game here in the United States with the support of its members. For more information, visit ussoccer.com.

 

ABOUT THE USA BID COMMITTEE INC.:

The USA Bid Committee is a non-profit organization created to prepare a successful application to host the FIFA World Cup™ in 2018 or 2022 on behalf of the United States Soccer Federation.  The Bid Committee will submit its comprehensive bid to FIFA by May 2010, with FIFA’s 24‑member Executive Committee making a decision in December 2010. Members of the USA Bid Committee include Executive Director David Downs, U.S. Soccer President and USA Bid Committee Chairman Sunil Gulati, U.S. Soccer CEO and General Secretary Dan Flynn, Major League Soccer Commissioner Don Garber, former U.S. Secretary of State Dr. Henry Kissinger, former Democratic National Committee National Finance Chair Philip Murphy, and former Goldman Sachs Vice Chairman (Asia) Carlos Cordeiro.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Neil Buethe, U.S. Soccer, 312/528-1270, nbuethe@ussoccer.org

Jurgen Mainka, USA Bid Committee, 212/450-1403, jmainka@usabidcommittee.org

Jim Woodcock, Fleishman-Hillard, 314/982-7778, jim.woodcock@fleishman.com

 

 

Metro Market

Stadium

Location

 

YES

Atlanta, Ga.

Georgia Dome

Atlanta, Ga.

 

NO

Atlanta, Ga.

Sanford Stadium

Athens, Ga.

 

 

NO

Austin, Texas

Royal Texas Memorial Stadium

Austin, Texas

 

YES

Baltimore, Md.

M&T Bank Stadium

Baltimore, Md.

 

NO

Baton Rouge, La.

Tiger Stadium

Baton Rouge, La.

 

YES

Birmingham, Ala.

Legion Field

Birmingham, Ala.

 

NO

Birmingham, Ala.

Bryant-Denny Stadium

Tuscaloosa, Ala.

YES

Boston, Mass.

Gillette Stadium

Foxborough, Mass.

 

 

YES

Buffalo, N.Y.

Ralph Wilson Stadium

Orchard Park, N.Y.

 

YES

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Kinnick Stadium

Iowa City, Iowa

 

YES

Champaign, Ill.

Memorial Stadium

Champaign, Ill.

 

YES

Charlotte, N.C.

Bank of America Stadium

Charlotte, N.C.

YES

Chicago, Ill.

Soldier Field

Chicago, Ill.

 

 

YES

Cincinnati, Ohio

Paul Brown Stadium

Cincinnati, Ohio

 

YES

Cleveland, Ohio

Cleveland Browns Stadium

Cleveland, Ohio

 

YES

Columbia, Mo.

Faurot Field

Columbia, Mo.

 

YES

Columbia, S.C.

Williams-Brice Stadium

Columbia, S.C.

 

NO

Columbus, Ga.

Jordan-Hare Stadium

Auburn, Ala.

 

YES

Columbus, Ohio

Ohio Stadium

Columbus, Ohio

YES

Dallas, Texas

Cotton Bowl

Dallas, Texas

 

YES

Dallas, Texas

Dallas Cowboys New Stadium

Arlington, Texas

 

 

YES

Denver, Colo.

Invesco Field

Denver, Colo.

YES

Detroit, Mich.

University of Michigan Stadium

Ann Arbor, Mich.

 

YES

Detroit, Mich.

Ford Field

Detroit, Mich.

 

NO

Detroit, Mich.

Spartan Stadium

East Lansing, Mich.

 

 

YES

Fayetteville, Ark.

Reynolds Razorback Stadium

Fayetteville, Ark.

 

YES

Green Bay, Wis.

Lambeau Field

Green Bay, Wis.

 

YES

Greenville, S.C.

Memorial Stadium

Clemson, S.C.

 

NO

Harrisburg, Pa.

Beaver Stadium

University Park, Pa.

YES

Houston, Texas

Reliant Stadium

Houston, Texas

 

YES

Houston, Texas

Rice Stadium

Houston, Texas

 

NO

Houston, Texas

Kyle Field

College Station, Texas

 

 

YES

Indianapolis, Ind.

Lucas Oil Stadium

Indianapolis, Ind.

 

YES

Jacksonville, Fla.

Jacksonville Municipal Stadium

Jacksonville, Fla.

 

PENDING

Jacksonville, Fla.

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium

Gainesville, Fla.

 

YES

Kansas City, Mo.

Arrowhead Stadium

Kansas City, Mo.

 

YES

Knoxville, Tenn.

Neyland Stadium

Knoxville, Tenn.

 

YES

Lexington, Ky.

Commonwealth Stadium

Lexington, Ky.

YES

Los Angeles, Calif.

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Los Angeles, Calif.

 

YES

Los Angeles, Calif.

Rose Bowl

Pasadena, Calif.

 

 

YES

Madison, Wis.

Camp Randall Stadium

Madison, Wis.

 

YES

Miami, Fla.

Dolphin Stadium

Miami Gardens, Fla.

YES

Minneapolis, Minn.

TCF Bank Stadium

Minneapolis, Minn.

 

YES

Minneapolis, Minn.

Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome

Minneapolis, Minn.

 

 

YES

Nashville, Tenn.

LP Field

Nashville, Tenn.

 

YES

New Haven, Conn.

Yale Bowl

New Haven, Conn.

 

YES

New Orleans, La.

Superdome

New Orleans, La.

YES

New York, N.Y.

Meadowlands Stadium

East Rutherford, N.J.

 

 

PENDING

Oklahoma City, Okla.

Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium

Norman, Okla.

 

NO

Omaha, Neb.

Memorial Stadium

Lincoln, Neb.

 

YES

Orlando, Fla.

Florida Citrus Bowl

Orlando, Fla.

YES

Philadelphia, Pa.

Lincoln Financial Field

Philadelphia, Pa.

 

YES

Phoenix, Ariz.

University of Phoenix Stadium

Glendale, Ariz.

 

YES

Phoenix, Ariz.

Sun Devil Stadium

Tempe, Ariz.

 

 

YES

Pittsburgh, Pa.

Heinz Field

Pittsburgh, Pa.

 

NO

Roanoke, Va.

Lane Stadium

Blacksburg, Va.

 

NO

Salt Lake City, Utah

LaVell Edwards Stadium

Provo, Utah

 

YES

San Antonio, Texas

Alamodome

San Antonio, Texas

 

YES

San Diego, Calif.

Qualcomm Stadium

San Diego, Calif.

YES

San Fran/Oakland, Calif.

Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum

Oakland, Calif.

 

YES

San Fran/Oakland, Calif.

Stanford Stadium

Palo Alto, Calif.

 

YES

San Fran/Oakland, Calif.

California Memorial Stadium

Berkeley, Calif.

 

YES

Seattle, Wash.

Qwest Field

Seattle, Wash.

 

YES

Seattle, Wash.

Husky Stadium

Seattle, Wash.

 

 

NO

South Bend, Ind.

Notre Dame Stadium

Notre Dame, Ind.

 

YES

St. Louis, Mo.

Edward Jones Dome

St. Louis, Mo.

 

YES

Tallahassee, Fla.

Doak Campbell Stadium

Tallahassee, Fla.

YES

Tampa, Fla.

Raymond James Stadium

Tampa, Fla.

 

YES

Washington, D.C.

RFK Memorial Stadium

Washington, D.C.

 

YES

Washington, D.C.

FedEx Field

Landover, Md.

 

Addition to Original List of candidates

 

YES

Las Vegas, Nevada

Sports City USA

Las Vegas

 

YES

Salt Lake City, Utah

Rice-Eccles Stadium

Salt Lake City

 

 

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Responses

  1. […] Kinnick Stadium is a yes for World Cup « On Iowa […]

  2. As sweet as this would be, after seeing the full list, I would say Kinnick’s chances are slim to none. and Slim’s on his way to Lucas Oil Stadium…

  3. Good one, Mouton!

    I agree. IIRC, the last time the World Cup was here, the closest to us was Soldier Field. I think this area would have an issue with hotel rooms.

  4. […] On Iowa created an interesting post today on Kinnick Stadium is a yes for World CupHere’s a short outlineThe Kinnick-World Cup bid thingie came up again today. Apparently, the UI is interested. Penn State, Michigan State and Nebraska said no thanks. Iowa, Ohio State and Wisconsin are yes’s. Here’s the release: USA BID COMMITTEE RECEIVES CONFIRMATION FROM 58 VENUES INTERESTED IN HOLDING FIFA WORLD CUP ™ MATCHES IN 2018 OR 2022   Las Vegas, Raleigh-Durham and Rice-Eccles Stadium in Salt Lake City Express Interest     NEW YORK (Ap […]

  5. How dare they beseach the hallowed grounds that we fondly call Kinnick Stadium.


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