Posted by: marcmwm | July 10, 2009

Hall of Ferentz — Fullback

Iowa State's Atif Austin trips up Iowa's Jeremy Allen during the second quarter of their game Saturday, Nov. 24, 2001, at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames. Allen is the statistical anomaly of Iowa fullbacks during the Kirk Ferentz era. He was used more as an offensive weapon than a lead blocker. (Gazette/file)

Iowa State's Atif Austin trips up Iowa's Jeremy Allen during the second quarter of their game Saturday, Nov. 24, 2001, at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames. Allen is the statistical anomaly of Iowa fullbacks during the Kirk Ferentz era. He was used more as an offensive weapon than a lead blocker. (Gazette/file)

Fullback was easy. Pretty much a no-brainer, statistically, but Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz doesn’t just judge it by stats.

1) Jeremy Allen (1998-2001)

The numbers are in. Jeremy Allen is the king of Iowa fullbacks.

He is if you’re looking for the flashy offensive numbers. During his two years at the position, Allen put up stats no other Iowa fullback has touched during Ferentz’s 10-plus seasons.

Allen made the fullback position a legitimate threat in 2001, rushing for 247 yards and four touchdowns and catching 20 passes for 264 yards and another four TDs. Iowa used Allen, who went to Iowa as a shot putter, in a lot of one-back sets, where he could block ably or jump out into the flat.

His numbers stand a head above Iowa’s fullbacks before and since 2001. But Ferentz isn’t just looking for numbers.

“(Allen) was a phenomenal athlete,” Ferentz said. “He wasn’t nearly as strong a blocker as the guys (Iowa has gone with since). There’s some give and take.”

The give has been Iowa hasn’t gotten numbers, rushing or receiving, from fullback.

During his four years as starter (2004-07), Tom Busch’s best season rushing the ball was 32 yards. His best season as a receiver was 2006, when he caught eight for 55 yards and three TDs.

Last season, the position has been split between sophomore Brett Morse and freshman Wade Leppert. Morse had five catches for 40 yards and no carries. Leppert had five catches for 22 yards and no carries.

“In a perfect world, you’d like to use them a bit in the passing game, but in our offense, more times than not, they’re blocking,” Ferentz said. “That’s the way it is.”

They had no carries and they don’t expect any.

“Very, very rarely,” Morse said. “It’s kind of a trick play for us.”

2) Edgar Cervantes (2000-03)

Cervantes was the last fullback Iowa coaches even thought of as a weapon. In his two seasons as starter, he rushed 55 times for 262 yards and two TDs. In 2003, he caught 17 passes for 137 yards.

“Not really,” Ferentz said when asked if he’d like more flexibility. “I’m comfortable. We’ve had some good offenses. Edgar (Cervantes) wasn’t real big in terms of touching the ball. We’re not a vintage West Coast team in that regard.” 
 
3) Tom Busch (2004-07)

Busch’s numbers show the decline of FB as an offensive weapon. As a freshman, he carried the ball 12 times. His junior and senior seasons he carried three times total. He had 20 career receptions, including just two his senior year.

Iowa’s offense tasks its fullbacks to lead running backs into the hole, take on linebackers, clear the way. Ferentz said he would happily take another Jeremy Allen, but Iowa’s fullbacks have done what they’ve been asked to do.

With spread offenses sweeping the nation’s high schools, pure fullbacks are almost non-existent. Allen arrived, basically, from Big Ten shot put rings. He was a one-of-a-kind freak athlete. Cervantes, Busch and Morse arrived as linebackers.

Coaches told Morse fullback would be his ticket to the field. That made it was an easy sell.

“(Coaches) said, we’re bringing in some good linebackers, we think you’ll be able to help the team faster here,” said Morse, who, as quarterback for Hinsdale (Ill.) Central, holds the Illinois High School Association record with a 98-yard TD pass in a playoff game. “It’s a great opportunity and I kind of went with it.”

Morse was a lifelong quarterback before going to Iowa. The 6-foot-3, 235-pounder has learned the art of the lead block from scratch.

“Everything I’ve done here has pretty much been different for me,” Morse said. “But it’s been a blast.”

According to Ferentz, Leppert is doing exactly what he wants to do.

Not long before last season started, Leppert, a 6-0, 235-pounder from Mundelein (Ill.) High School, was a total outsider. As a four-year starter at linebacker and fullback in high school, Leppert was a pure fullback. He wrote letters to Ferentz and the Iowa staff, basically begging for a shot.

“I asked (running backs coach) Lester (Erb), who is this guy and why is he bothering us?” Ferentz said. Then, in two December practices last fall, Leppert opened eyes.

“That’s when I asked, OK, who’s this Leppert guy again? Where did he come from?” Ferentz said. “(Fullback) is what he’s built for, it’s what he wanted to do.”

It’s not as if they go in thinking it’s going to be something it’s not. Iowa’s fullback has carried the ball three times in the last three seasons. This is no bait and switch. This is a thankless job and they always seem to find someone to do it.

Honorable mention: Aaron Mickens (2001-04). Remember him? He was, essentially, Iowa’s last ballcarrier standing in 2004, when as a FB and emergency running back, he carried 37 times for 113 yards and a TD. Mickens saw opportunity at FB and jumped in and made the most of it.

Arizona State's Brian Montesanto (97) wraps up Iowa's Edgar Cervantes (40) during the first quarter of Iowa's 21-2 victory Saturday September 20, 2003 at Kinnick Stadium. (Brian Ray/Gazette)

Arizona State's Brian Montesanto (97) wraps up Iowa's Edgar Cervantes (40) during the first quarter of Iowa's 21-2 victory Saturday September 20, 2003 at Kinnick Stadium. (Brian Ray/Gazette)

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Responses

  1. If we’re just going to use these guys as deep-set guards, I wonder why we don’t put a Mike Sellers (285 lb. H back for the Skins) back there. In support, I’ve read Mitch King may get some looks at fullback for the Titans. Really what you’re looking for is a good burst out of the three point and some pop at the second level. Given the 0 carries, it’s not like we’re forcing defenses to account for them in any way. (Vs. a spread, where the qb and all of the backs — two more athletes — must be accounted for.)

  2. Where is Champ Davis on this list? Joking aside, he is a good friend of mine and unfortunately suffered through too many injuries during his time at Iowa. He certainly had the talent to become a solid fullback, but was plagued with those injury issues.

    It is very unfortunate and almost sad to see the fullback position die a slow death due to the evolution of the spread. Although I think Power-I and Pro-Set football will return, it will be 10 or so more years.

    Go Hawks!

  3. I like Morse quite a bit at Full back because he’s got pretty good hands. I think he’s a pretty good football player. Leppert is a much smaller target as a receiver.

    As far as Fullback position and blocking, when I watch it seems like 50% of time the full back ends up blocking someone that is not in a postion to make a play. The fullback starts back much further from the line, so it takes awhile for him to get to the line to block and by the time he does, the RB has often made a cut in another direction.

    I think having a big half back that can go in motion and be used as a blocker or a receiver is more effective formation as the guy can engage in a block quicker, but one would have to go through a full season film to compare success rates. The fact that we don’t use the fullback much these days does indicate its success rate is down.

  4. i have a fever. and the prescription…is more fullback.

  5. AM, when Champ was healthy, he produced, see TD reception that put Iowa over the top @ Wisconsin in ’05.

  6. Cervantes made some critical short yardage plays in ’03 on teams where our lead running back was a small guy (Russell). Lewis was also around at RB but Cervantes was a good short-yardage power option and a good change-of-pace for earlier downs.

  7. Actually ’02 and ’03

  8. Cervantes also had a critical fumble against USC in the Orange Bowl. USC had scored to open the 2nd half, but was driving and had the ball around midfield. Edgar had the ball across the 50 for a first down, and somebody from USC hit him from behind and knocked the ball out.

    USC recovered, Justin Fargas ran it in from 40 yards out a few plays later, and that was your ball game. Iowa never recovered.

  9. Bellanca has never really warmed to the 3rd guard concept (or even the 3rd guard practice). :)


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